Book Reviews

A stunning story about an amazing hike

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 While you will be inspired by Thomas Jamrog’s amazing experience hiking the Continental Divide Trail, you will not be inspired to do that hike.

For one thing, it’s a 2500 mile 5 month journey through New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana, on a trail often described as desolate and brutal. Having read Jamrog’s book, In the Path of Young Bulls, published by Maine Authors Publishing, I think that description is an understatement.

But I found the book fascinating and was unable to put it down, racing through it as fast as I could, captivated by his detailed (and sometimes troubling) accounts of each day. This really is an incredible story.

Laurie Chandler’s paddling adventure was amazing and inspiring

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 After reading Upwards, I’m not sure I want to tackle the entire Northern Forest Canoe Trail. But I sure do want to paddle some of the trail.

Laurie Apgar Chandler was the first woman to solo paddle the Northern Forest Canoe Trail, and her new book is a detailed and inspiring account of that 740 mile adventure including 67 portages totaling 125 miles.

Her faith, and remembrance of padding some of the trail with her husband Chris who died at a young age of a heart attack, are inspiring, and her fierce determination to get through tough portages, awful storms, fierce winds, and lots of long days of paddling, is amazing.

We Kill The Spiders by Rob Neal

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 Rob Neal’s new book, We Kill The Spiders, is both humorous and insightful. Best of all, Rob’s advice to men is right on the mark. Pay attention guys!

Published by Maine Publishers Allliance, which does a great job helping authors publish their books, Rob’s first book is a keeper.

Promoted as “Ten Jobs for Men Who Love Women and Sports” the book relates Rob’s experiences as a fanatical sports fan. I’ll tell you right now, his wife must be a saint.

Clinton Townsend’s Memoir is Amazing

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The title of Clinton Townsend’s memoir is both ironic and wrong. The book is titled Trouble Maker, and Bill was not that. He was one of our state’s greatest conservationists and an inspiration to many, including me.

But I get the title. Bill was certainly an environmental agitator, pushing us forward on my important issues and projects.

The first part of the book is about his personal life, while part two takes us through his many years of practicing law. I learned a lot about Bill in these two sections and they were very interesting.

More Great Stories from a South Dakota game warden

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After reading D.B. McCrea’s first book about his adventures as a South Dakota game warden, I couldn’t wait to read his second book, and it is also a keeper.

In book #2, The Forgotten Lawmen 2, McCrea has moved to the Sioux Falls area, the fastest growing section of South Dakota, and a place filled with poachers. And McCrea is all about catching and stopping them. And that he does. He is both diligent and determined.

He is all over poachers of deer, mourning doves, fish, and more. And his stories will both entertain and amaze you.

This book will inspire you to get outside and write about it

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 The Naturalist’s Notebook will inspire you to get outside and write about it in a journal. Authors Nat Wheelwright and Bernd Heinrich even include a 5-year calendar-journal for you to use.

When we purchased our camp in the North Woods in 1991, we started a journal, recording the wonderful things that happened there, including lots of moose and deer in our yard. We also have photo albums that record a lot of those fun things, including our hikes up Baxter Park’s mountains. Baxter Park is our camp’s back yard.

The Forgotten Lawmen by D.B. McCrea

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The Forgotten Lawmen by D.B. McCrea

DB McCrea, the author of The Forgotten Law Men – The Life and Adventures of a South Dakota Game Warden - has written a wonderful account of his 23 years as a game warden in South Dakota.

Actually, shortly after McCrea began his job they changed his title to conservation officer, something he never liked. Starting his career in a location that had not had a warden for a long time, he found himself in the land of poachers, some of whom were very dangerous.

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