Blogs

Do you know where your snake is tonight?

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 Imagine entering your home or apartment and seeing a 3 ½ foot python snake stalking your parakeets. Well, that’s just what happened to a Fairfield resident who lives in an apartment building in that Maine town. The resident called the police shortly after arriving home at 10:20 pm and spotting the snake, and a local police officer got the snake into a pillowcase and took it to the Fairfield Police Department where a Maine game warden picked it up the next morning.

The snake was apparently taken to an animal sanctuary, disappointed, no doubt, in its inability to chow down on those parakeets.

Well, this was a very unusual event, you might say, so what’s the big deal? Unfortunately, it’s not that unusual these days. In October, a woman in Orrington, while cleaning outside her greenhouse, nearly stepped on a ball python that had been missing since July. Yes, that python lived happily in the great Maine outdoors for three months. The lady panicked and dialed 911 for urgent assistance.

Maine’s new big game plans are all about you

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 The second meeting of a committee overseeing the creation of new big game management plans demonstrated how important the general public and private landowners will be to the process. For the first time, the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife is aggressively seeking the opinions of the public and private landowners.

In addition to public meetings where all can be heard, surveys and focus groups will be conducted by Mark Duda and his national firm, Responsive Management, which is also working on a communications project and plan for the agency, as well as a project to create new fisheries management plans (more about that in this outdoor news blog soon). Yesterday  the Big Game Steering Committee spent two hours reviewing Duda’s surveys. He’ll be surveying three groups: hunters, the general public, and private landowners.

Great News! Skowhegan’s Pickup Café now offers lunch

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Skowhegan
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 Linda

                Whenever I hear Skowhegan’s Pickup Cafe mentioned, I smile. The thought of a cafe that opens its garage door side wall to a wonderful patio and pergola in the summer, then closes those same doors to provide a unique cozy space when the weather turns chilly, is true Maine. The farm to table movement is at the forefront and is the driving force behind this restaurant. The wall listing over 50 farms and local suppliers says it all. You know that freshness and quality ingredients matter here. Adam and Rosa Rosario do a superb job here.

                And here’s some really good news. The Pickup Cafe just started serving lunch during the week, Wednesday through Friday. It didn't take us long after hearing this to set up a time to visit. They still serve dinners on Friday and Saturday nights and brunch from 7 - 2 on the weekends. 

All you need to know about cooking wild game

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              Here’s all you need to know about cooking wild game: Kate Krukowski Gooding. From her cookbooks to her stage performances, Kate is simply the best. She serves the best beaver stew, for sure, and when she prepared and served it at the Maine Harvest Festival in Bangor in 2014, everyone – and yes, I mean everyone – raved about it. At this year’s festival, she made two amazing lasagnas featuring wild game meat and Beast Feast Maine sauces.

               Kate has written four popular cookbooks: Wild Maine Recipes, 50 Ways to Eat a Beaver, Free Range Fish&Lobster, and Simple Gourmet Lamb. In some of the books she includes side dishes and wine pairings. You can order all of Kate’s books online at the Islandport Press website or from your local bookstore. These books would make great Christmas presents

All you need to know about cooking wild game

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Here’s all you need to know about cooking wild game: Kate Krukowski Gooding. From her cookbooks to her stage performances, Kate is simply the best. She serves the best beaver stew, for sure, and when she prepared and served it at the Maine Harvest Festival in Bangor in 2014, everyone – and yes, I mean everyone – raved about it. At this year’s festival, she made two amazing lasagnas featuring wild game meat and Beast Feast Maine sauces.

Hunting has changed a lot in my lifetime

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                 Introducing a segment on the end of the firearms season on deer, the female TV 6 newscaster issued a warning that “some of the images might be disturbing.” My, how hunting has changed, in my lifetime.  We would mount our dead deer on the front hood of the car and parade up Winthrop’s Main Street, then hang the deer in the front yard for all to see and admire. Yes, admire. I don’t believe anyone found the dead deer to be disturbing.

                As the TV 6 segment was showing, I was wondering if people who pass the supermarket meat counters are disturbed by all that meat, cut out of animals for their dining pleasure. Can it really be disturbing to see a deer killed by a hunter who values the opportunity to harvest his or her own animals and feed his or her family fresh, healthy meat?

TV show features important outdoor Maine issues

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 Ben Sprague is an interesting young man, a Bangor banker who enthusiastically interviews Maine people for his weekly podcast called “The Maine Show.” When he invited me to be a guest on his show, I checked it out and was impressed with the folks he’s interviewed and the issues he’s tackled. It’s a very interesting show.

Ben caught up with me at the Maine Harvest Festival at the Cross Center in Bangor, and we taped the show in a room at the auditorium. I talked about my career as an advocate for sportsmen and conservation, including my 18 years at the Sportsman’s Alliance of Maine.

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