Blogs

Persistence Pays Off When Pursuing Deer

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 You should never assume you missed a deer without spending lots of time in persistent pursuit of it. Today I’ll tell you a few stories of mine that demonstrate this point.

Ethan Emerson triggered these memories in his column in the February, 2017 issue of The Maine Sportsman. The title of his column is “A Hunter’s Ethical Responsibility To Track Down Wounded Game” and he notes that, “The real work begins after you pull the trigger.” He tells his own story too, of a long several-days pursuit of a wounded buck by one of his friends.

About 40 years ago, the first huge buck I’d ever seen while hunting sauntered by me. I got off five shots, but was shaking so badly that I was sure I’d missed. I checked out the area where the buck was walking when I shot, saw no signs that I’d hit him, and headed home, morose.

How low will they (Maine’s Moose) go?

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 There’s not a lot of consensus or agreement on key issues in the new 15-year moose management plans, and the most recent meeting of the Big Game Steering Committee spent quite a bit of time on these issues.

From when moose hunting weeks should be scheduled, to the need for more research, to strategies to reduce the serious impact of ticks on moose, there’s always a lot to talk about at these meetings. The Steering Committee is working with the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife to create new plans for moose, deer, bear, and turkeys.

Lee Kantar, DIF&W’s very capable lead moose biologist, always has a lot of interesting information for the committee. For example, I found this statement from Lee to be interesting: “It’s inappropriate to suggest that a moose harvest in southern Maine will reduce moose/car collisions.”

How low will they (Maine’s Moose) go?

Blog Showcase Image: 

 There’s not a lot of consensus or agreement on key issues in the new 15-year moose management plans, and the most recent meeting of the Big Game Steering Committee spent quite a bit of time on these issues.

From when moose hunting weeks should be scheduled, to the need for more research, to strategies to reduce the serious impact of ticks on moose, there’s always a lot to talk about at these meetings. The Steering Committee is working with the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife to create new plans for moose, deer, bear, and turkeys.

Lee Kantar, DIF&W’s very capable lead moose biologist, always has a lot of interesting information for the committee. For example, I found this statement from Lee to be interesting: “It’s inappropriate to suggest that a moose harvest in southern Maine will reduce moose/car collisions.”

How low will they (Maine’s Moose) go?

Blog Showcase Image: 

 There’s not a lot of consensus or agreement on key issues in the new 15-year moose management plans, and the most recent meeting of the Big Game Steering Committee spent quite a bit of time on these issues.

From when moose hunting weeks should be scheduled, to the need for more research, to strategies to reduce the serious impact of ticks on moose, there’s always a lot to talk about at these meetings. The Steering Committee is working with the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife to create new plans for moose, deer, bear, and turkeys.

Lee Kantar, DIF&W’s very capable lead moose biologist, always has a lot of interesting information for the committee. For example, I found this statement from Lee to be interesting: “It’s inappropriate to suggest that a moose harvest in southern Maine will reduce moose/car collisions.”

Are you getting “ticked” off by high populations of deer?

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 Lyme and other diseases caused by deer ticks provoked a lengthy discussion at the last meeting of the Big Game Steering Committee, a group that is working with the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife to create new 15-year management plans for deer, moose, bear, and turkeys.

Tom Doak, the director of the Maine Woodland Owners group, was the first to raise Lyme as a concern, noting, “We’ll make a mistake if we don’t address this in the plan.”

“This is a serious public health issue,” he said, “I don’t know how you are going to resolve the desire for more deer by hunters and the concerns by the public about Lyme disease.”

Don Kleiner of the Maine Professional Guides Association jumped in to add concerns about other illnesses caused by deer ticks.

Ardeana Hamlin’s novels are enjoyable reads

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                 I wasn’t sure I’d like these novels, given that they are set in 19th century Bangor and focused on lots of family problems and challenges, but from the very first page of Pink Chimneys, I was hooked. And after finishing that book, I moved quickly to Hamlin’s follow-up novel, Abbott’s Reach.

                My thanks to Islandport Press in Yarmouth for republishing these novels in paperback, making them easily accessible for all of us.

Ardeana Hamlin’s novels are enjoyable reads

Blog Showcase Image: 

                 I wasn’t sure I’d like these novels, given that they are set in 19th century Bangor and focused on lots of family problems and challenges, but from the very first page of Pink Chimneys, I was hooked. And after finishing that book, I moved quickly to Hamlin’s follow-up novel, Abbott’s Reach.

                My thanks to Islandport Press in Yarmouth for republishing these novels in paperback, making them easily accessible for all of us.

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