How low will they (Maine’s Moose) go?

Blog Showcase Image: 

 There’s not a lot of consensus or agreement on key issues in the new 15-year moose management plans, and the most recent meeting of the Big Game Steering Committee spent quite a bit of time on these issues.

From when moose hunting weeks should be scheduled, to the need for more research, to strategies to reduce the serious impact of ticks on moose, there’s always a lot to talk about at these meetings. The Steering Committee is working with the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife to create new plans for moose, deer, bear, and turkeys.

Lee Kantar, DIF&W’s very capable lead moose biologist, always has a lot of interesting information for the committee. For example, I found this statement from Lee to be interesting: “It’s inappropriate to suggest that a moose harvest in southern Maine will reduce moose/car collisions.”

How low will they (Maine’s Moose) go?

Blog Showcase Image: 

 There’s not a lot of consensus or agreement on key issues in the new 15-year moose management plans, and the most recent meeting of the Big Game Steering Committee spent quite a bit of time on these issues.

From when moose hunting weeks should be scheduled, to the need for more research, to strategies to reduce the serious impact of ticks on moose, there’s always a lot to talk about at these meetings. The Steering Committee is working with the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife to create new plans for moose, deer, bear, and turkeys.

Lee Kantar, DIF&W’s very capable lead moose biologist, always has a lot of interesting information for the committee. For example, I found this statement from Lee to be interesting: “It’s inappropriate to suggest that a moose harvest in southern Maine will reduce moose/car collisions.”

How low will they (Maine’s Moose) go?

Blog Showcase Image: 

 There’s not a lot of consensus or agreement on key issues in the new 15-year moose management plans, and the most recent meeting of the Big Game Steering Committee spent quite a bit of time on these issues.

From when moose hunting weeks should be scheduled, to the need for more research, to strategies to reduce the serious impact of ticks on moose, there’s always a lot to talk about at these meetings. The Steering Committee is working with the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife to create new plans for moose, deer, bear, and turkeys.

Lee Kantar, DIF&W’s very capable lead moose biologist, always has a lot of interesting information for the committee. For example, I found this statement from Lee to be interesting: “It’s inappropriate to suggest that a moose harvest in southern Maine will reduce moose/car collisions.”

Are you getting “ticked” off by high populations of deer?

Blog Showcase Image: 

 Lyme and other diseases caused by deer ticks provoked a lengthy discussion at the last meeting of the Big Game Steering Committee, a group that is working with the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife to create new 15-year management plans for deer, moose, bear, and turkeys.

Tom Doak, the director of the Maine Woodland Owners group, was the first to raise Lyme as a concern, noting, “We’ll make a mistake if we don’t address this in the plan.”

“This is a serious public health issue,” he said, “I don’t know how you are going to resolve the desire for more deer by hunters and the concerns by the public about Lyme disease.”

Don Kleiner of the Maine Professional Guides Association jumped in to add concerns about other illnesses caused by deer ticks.

Ardeana Hamlin’s novels are enjoyable reads

Blog Showcase Image: 

                 I wasn’t sure I’d like these novels, given that they are set in 19th century Bangor and focused on lots of family problems and challenges, but from the very first page of Pink Chimneys, I was hooked. And after finishing that book, I moved quickly to Hamlin’s follow-up novel, Abbott’s Reach.

                My thanks to Islandport Press in Yarmouth for republishing these novels in paperback, making them easily accessible for all of us.

Ardeana Hamlin’s novels are enjoyable reads

Blog Showcase Image: 

                 I wasn’t sure I’d like these novels, given that they are set in 19th century Bangor and focused on lots of family problems and challenges, but from the very first page of Pink Chimneys, I was hooked. And after finishing that book, I moved quickly to Hamlin’s follow-up novel, Abbott’s Reach.

                My thanks to Islandport Press in Yarmouth for republishing these novels in paperback, making them easily accessible for all of us.

Great information for grouse hunters

Blog Showcase Image: 

 A 3 year study of Maine’s Ruffed Grouse is delivering a lot of interesting and helpful information. At the recent annual meeting of the Maine Woodland Owners (formerly the Small Woodland Owners Association of Maine), Eric Blomberg told us all about their project’s findings to date.

Blomberg is a University of Maine at Orono staffer who leads the grouse research project, working with wildlife biologists at the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. They are now 2 ½ years into the 3 year study, using tagged grouse in two areas including off the Stud Mill Road.

Eric said that only 13% of their tagged birds were harvested by hunters in 2015. This year they are focusing on research of predation. And no surprise, winter is tough on these birds. 32% of adult grouse and 47% of juvenile birds died last winter, and according to Blomberg, predation is “almost exclusively” the cause of death.

Site by Fieldstone Media